Sat. Jun 22nd, 2024

A MAN who grew up in an ancient cliffside cave in Italy has converted his quirky grotto home into a successful business.

Gennaro Romano is one of many locals and expats on the island of Ponza who take refuge from the Mediterranean heat inside caves.

Trip Advisor

Gennaro believes his cave home-turned-restaurant in Ponza, Italy, could now be worth £860,000 after extensive renovations[/caption]

Trip Advisor

The restaurant is a popular spot with tourists, owing in part to its stunning sea views[/caption]

La Marina

Gennaro Romano is one of many locals on the island of Ponza who has grown up in a cave home[/caption]

The ancient homes, once inhabited by cavemen, are carved from thick stone which keeps them cool in the summer and warm in winter.

54-year-old Gerrano has turned his, cut into a cliff, into a popular restaurant called “La Marina” with stunning sea views.

The home-turned-restaurant used to be a fisherman’s canteen, keeping the daily catch cool and hygienic for locals.

And following his extensive renovations, he now believes the eatery is worth £860,000.

Part of it’s charm comes from the direct access customers can enjoy to the beach, perfect if they want to earn their pasta with a swim.

It’s also a useful venue to choose for a restaurant, as, thanks to it’s cool temperatures it doesn’t need too much electricity or air conditioning.

Local estate agent Maurizio Musella told inews that all the homes in Ponza, which may seem typical from the outside, have underground caves.

The hidden grottos date back thousands of years and some, carved into sea cliffs like Gennaro’s, have panoramic views of the sea.

He’s seen a 40 per cent increase in business for selling and renting the unique houses, as tourists are choosing them more and more as second home options.

The grotto homes are often painted white and while they don’t need much electricity or air conditioning, they do come with cisterns to collect rainwater for plumbing.

‘Furniture’ like wardrobes, beds, bathtubs, kitchens and seating are carved from the rock and softened with furnishings.

“The thick walls are painted white inside and out, keeping the cave dwellings fresh in summer and warm in winter,” Maurizio adds.

“These were the Ponza people’s first houses. We’ve been living in here since the dawn of time.”

Gennaro might be onto something with his high estimation for the restaurants worth, as these “case grotta” homes also come with a hefty price tag.

While smaller ones of around 50 square metres will set you back around £175,000, a three-bedroom cave home is usually around half a million.

One British couple visited Spain for a holiday in 2018 and rented a similar cave home for the trip.

They loved the quirky home so much, they ended up flogging their home in Suffolk and buying one to live in full time.

And Ponza isn’t the only community filled with ancient grotto style houses.

Kandovan, in northwestern Iran, is one of the world’s largest modern cave dwellings.

Over 150 families happily live in the village converted from volcanic rock.

Trip Advisor

Carved into the sea cliffs of the idyllic town, the stone walls keep the restaurant cool in the summer and warm in the winter[/caption]

Trip Advisor

The ancient cave dwelling used to be a fisherman’s canteen, keeping the daily catch cool and hygienic for locals[/caption]

The quirky restaurant is nestled into a sea cliff on the coast of the island
People dining at the restaurant have stunning views of the beach which is directly below them
Trip Advisor

It works as a useful venue for a restaurant, as, thanks to it’s cool temperatures it doesn’t need too much electricity or air conditioning[/caption]

Trip Advisor

Local estate agent Maurizio Musella said that all the homes in Ponza, which may seem typical from the outside, have underground caves[/caption]

Getty

Ponza isn’t the only community filled with ancient grotto style houses, Kandovan, Iran, is home to over 150 families who live in caves[/caption]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.